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Welcome one and all to the 'Philippine Railway Historical Society' blogsite. This site was set up to share photos, historical pieces, comment and virtually anything else pertaining to transportation in the Philippines, with a special emphasis on rail. Occasional we vary from topic, but this is the less serious side of the hobby shining through - cause sometimes, in this miserable and uptight world, we just take ourselves a little too seriously.

If you have a question Philippine railway related, just drop us a line, maybe we can help.
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Friday, March 17, 2017

OPERATION ADOBO #7

THE GREAT PHILIPPINE RETURN

Stay Tuned


In coming weeks we will cover all the transport related photos from last weeks trip to the Philippines.

A trip report is also in the making and will appear on our official website in the near future.


It is great to be back. They worked hard to destroy me...but it failed. :-)

For more photos, those other than just Philippine transport related ones, feel free to check out my Semi-Retired Foamer website.


Thursday, March 2, 2017



Interested in being part of the Philippine's longest running railfan interest group?

Started in 1999, we have proven that 'being official' does not necessarily 
mean you will survive.

Below are Facebook groups we currently run.

Philippine Railway Historical Society

Philippine Transportation

Philippine / Australia Aviation Fans (formerly FILDAC-A)

Plus you can also find us as PhilippineRailways on Yahoogroups.
A huge database of historical Philippine rail info.





Bicol Express at Pasay Road station.




video

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

BICOL EXPRESS TO RETURN....AGAIN!


  The Bicol Express has been an on again, off again, service for as long as I have been going to the Philippines.
  However, after a break of some years following an accident, the following article suggests that it is to again make a comeback.
  Heres hoping it lasts longer this time round.




Train ride to Bicol ‘bumpy’
By: Delfin T. Mallari Jr., Juan Escandor Jr., Maricar Cinco - 
@inquirerdotnetPhilippine Daily Inquirer / 12:24 AM November 19, 2016

NAGA CITY—It was not a smooth ride for the inspection run of the Philippine National Railways (PNR) train that would ply the Manila-Naga City route by Dec. 15.

The inspection train, made up of three coaches, left the Tutuban station in Manila at 5:15 a.m. on Friday, carrying PNR officials led by Joseline Geronimo, PNR officer in charge. The team had set out to reach Naga City in Camarines Sur province by nightfall Friday.

But it was a slow ride as informal settlers, wet market vendors, trees and sections of houses along the PNR track blocked the route in Laguna province.

Geronimo said the inspection was smooth until the train reached the Mamatid station in Cabuyao City, also in Laguna.

“After Mamatid, there were some interactions, encroachments by informal settlers [near the rail tracks],” Geronimo said.

The train had to stop at some point as PNR personnel remove debris, tree branches and trunks blocking the track or clear canopies of some houses.

In Calamba City, “talipapa” (village wet market) vendors were asked to move out for the train to pass through.

“We’ve fixed this issue (informal settlers) before but they just keep coming back. It’s one of the things we need to ask help from our local governments,” Geronimo said.

“Like in Candelaria (town in Quezon province), nakiraan pa kami (We had to ask permission to pass through). In Los BaƱos (town in Laguna), the coaches [hit the ground] in some elevated portions,” she said.

The train reached Lucena City at 11:30 a.m., stopping at the abandoned station. The PNR’s safety steel bar at the railroad crossing near the station and warning lights were broken.

As of 5 p.m. on Friday, the train was in Tagkawayan town in Quezon. It was expected to reach Ragay town in Camarines Sur at 6:30 p.m.

A portion of the railway bridge in Ragay that connects the villages of Apali and Apad is undergoing repairs, after it collapsed when a flash flood washed out one of its support foundations in March this year.

Geronimo said the inspection team would alight from the coaches in Ragay and transfer to another train to bring them to Naga City.

Ricarte Galopa, PNR security chief, said team members did not note any major safety issue along the route in Laguna and Quezon provinces.

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“After the test run, an assessment meeting will immediately follow to discuss some critical areas along the Manila-Bicol route, particularly the conditions of the bridges,” Geronimo said.

Geronimo said she would invite officials from local governments along the route to help the PNR solve local problems, particularly the clearing of houses along the tracks.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016






Proudly Supporting The PRHS.

Servicing the Filipino community of Riverwood, 
Narwee, Kingsgrove, Beverly Hills,
Penshurst, Roselands, Mortdale and area.

Right outside Narwee Railway Station.

Philippine Food, Drinks, Snacks, Freight and Remit services.

OPEN 7 DAYS

3/43 Broad Arrow Road, Narwee 2209
9534-7727







Monday, April 25, 2016

PHILIPPINE NATIONAL RAILWAYS
ROLLINGSTOCK UPDATE

APRIL 2016

For anyone interested I have completed a new Philippine National Railways rollingstock update as of April 2016.

Loco Hauled Stock
DMU
EMU
Freight and Perway
Rollingstock Numbers Back To 2004.



Monday, April 4, 2016



I'M BACK

  Yep it has been a long time since I last posted here.
  Trouble makers just seem to make it all to hard at times. Sadly there are a number of them in the Philippines rail hobby.

  However, eventually I see them for the fools they are and, well, I guess I have reached that point again now.

  To start with, lets look at some photos from back in 2011.


PASAY ROAD
























Monday, October 27, 2014

Some Random Philippine Piccies Pt1


                                                                 Howdee all,
                  Yes, yes, you don't need to tell me - it has been some time since I last posted.
  One has been quite busy with rail hobby related things Down Under and, as such, my Philippine railway activities have taken a back seat for a while.
  We are trying to set up the ground work for rail tours to help support preservation attempts around Australia.
  Similar to what we were doing a few years ago for the Philippines - but with the time needed to actually achieve dividends without constant pressure.

  I've been watching with much amusement the changing railfan scene there in the Philippines and am happy to see a new group of young guys carrying on the passion I once had. Their reports and railway visits are great and I look forward to meeting them one day.
  To the PNR Train Enthusiasts Fanclub, the PRHS wishes you all the best.

  On the other hand there is the, not totally unexpected, demise of RIHSPI and another offshoot group in the "Manila Railroad Club' who plan to preserve the little bit that has not been scrapped during the original groups term of existence.
  The same old secrecy and powers at the helm, well, it does not instill much confidence.
  Hopefully I am wrong as their plans to restore 906 (and hopefully 902) depend on it.

 I've been getting some random shots prepared for Flickr and thought I would take the opportunity to stick them up here.
  There will be a lot more to come. But for now, I hope you harvey very fun time enjoying this random delicious selection of photographic tidbits. 



Divisoria - the place to head for cheap bargains and rip off DVDs.


The now scrapped 7A-2001 believed to be a victim of the Quezon accident is seen here at the Tayuman carriage shed in 2009.

Another 7A example in a slightly better condition at Tutuban station.
These were a second hand donation from Japan back in the early 2000s.



While checking out the situation in the loco shed I was surprised to hear a horn in the distance.
A quick sprint revealed 5009 leaving the yard on a perway train for the south.
 For once the sun was situated perfectly :-)



A Pandacan Transportation bus just for something different.

Stay tuned for more random helpings.

Sunday, May 4, 2014


LATEST PNR TIMETABLE
With special thanks to John Ibay.